Should you see a dentist or orthodontist for TMJ?

Do I see an orthodontist for TMJ?

If you are suffering from TMJ pain, it’s important to seek the right kind of orthodontist who will treat the root cause of your pain.

What is the best doctor to see for TMJ?

The Best Type of Doctor to See for TMJ Pain

If you’re experiencing TMJ pain, you should see a dentist. Dentists don’t just treat your teeth—they’re specialists who are trained in the anatomy of the jaw and diagnosing dysfunction in the bite.

Can a regular dentist treat TMJ?

Yes, a general dentist can treat their patients who have been diagnosed with temporomandibular joint disorder. A general dentist already understands how the jaw functions and can therefore offer patients who are suffering from TMJ pain a few different types of treatment options.

How long does it take to correct TMJ?

TMJ Treatment Types/Lengths

For most adults, the treatment averages anywhere from 18 months to three years. Therapies like massaging or stretching the jaw, stretching the neck, and stress reduction exercises can instantly provide some relief. Still, it may take anywhere from weeks to months to see the full benefits.

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How do you permanently cure TMJ?

Having said that, the following are how TMJ could be permanently cured:

  1. Custom-made splints. Custom-made splints are made to be fitted over your lower or upper teeth. …
  2. Physical therapy. Physical therapy involves appropriate exercises for the joint. …
  3. Surgery. …
  4. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation.

Is TMJ serious?

After being diagnosed with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD), many of our Nashville, TN, patients ask, “Is TMJ disorder serious?” The answer is that although the condition is not life-threatening, it can have significant negative effects on your dental and overall health.

Can TMJ affect your brain?

It can cause “brain fog,” a state of mental confusion and difficulty focusing. TMJ syndrome patients were found to score poorly on cognitive tests and used different regions of the brain than normal to complete tasks.

How long do TMJ flare ups last?

TMJ flare-ups can last from a couple of hours to several days. Untreated cases of TMJ disorder can become chronic and debilitating.

How can a dentist tell if you have TMJ?

Touch – your dentist will use their fingers to apply a bit of pressure to the jaw and TMJ to test for tenderness and pain. Sight – your dentist will look inside your mouth for signs of teeth grinding, clenching and alignment issues. They’ll also use X-Rays, if they’ve found evidence of a TMJ disorder.

Should I see a dentist for jaw pain?

If you notice tenderness in your jaw, pain when you bite or endure frequent headaches, make sure to schedule an appointment with your dentist. Although some causes of jaw pain are temporary and go away on their own, you may be experiencing the first symptoms of a serious dental problem.

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Will TMJ go away on its own?

Minor TMJ discomfort will usually go away without treatment. However, anyone with the following TMJ symptoms should consider an evaluation to prevent or avoid future issues: Constant or repeated episodes of pain or tenderness at the TMJ or in and around the ear. Discomfort or pain while chewing.

What can an orthodontist do for TMJ?

There are three common treatments for TMJ disorder which are non-invasive – a night guard that holds your teeth apart, keeping them from grinding against each other; a splint that needs to be worn all the time and braces to correct the bite.

Can TMJ make your ear feel clogged?

Since the TM joint resides adjacent to the ears, it’s common to experience many TMJ symptoms in the ears. Patients can experience ear pain or clogged ears that they might pass off as an ear infection or allergies but is actually from TMD. TMD can also cause tinnitus (ringing in the ears from nerve irritation).

What is the main cause of TMJ?

Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) disorders are conditions affecting the jaw joints and surrounding muscles and ligaments. It can be caused by trauma, an improper bite, arthritis or wear and tear. Common symptoms include jaw tenderness, headaches, earaches and facial pain.